Replications of Marketing Studies

  • So far, 5 out of 43 (11.6%) attempted replications in marketing were unambiguously successful.
  • This includes only high-powered, preregistered direct replications.
  • By default, successful replications are at the top.
Original studyStudy # (original)Replication studyUnambiguous successDate replication became availableProjectNotesOriginal sampleReplication sample
Dhar, R. (1997). Consumer preference for a no-choice option. Journal of consumer research, 24(2), 215-231.1 and 2Evangelidis, I., Levav, J., & Simonson, I. (2020). A Reexamination of the Impact of Decision Conflict on Choice Deferral. Available at SSRN 3702454. Forthcoming at Management Science.January 18, 2022The authors ran 40 experiments with a mix of direct and conceptual studies. More recent studies were preregistered. Fairly consistent failure to support findings of Dhar (1997) and Tversky and Shafir (1992). Most of the studies showed the opposite effect.total N = 490 studentstotal n = 26,703
Luce, M. F. (1998). Choosing to avoid: Coping with negatively emotion-laden consumer decisions. Journal of consumer research, 24(4), 409-433.1Evangelidis, I., Levav, J., & Simonson, I. (2020). A Reexamination of the Impact of Decision Conflict on Choice Deferral. Available at SSRN 3702454. Forthcoming at Management Science.January 18, 2022N=235N=903 Mturk
Johnson, E. J., Bellman, S., & Lohse, G. L. (2002). Defaults, framing and privacy: Why opting in-opting out1. Marketing letters, 13(1), 5-15.1Chandrashekar, S., Adelina, N., Zeng, S., Esther, C. Y. Y., Leung, G. Y. S., Henne, P., … Feldman, G. (2022, January 14). Defaults versus framing: Revisiting Default Effect and Framing Effect with replications and extensions of Johnson and Goldstein (2003) and Johnson, Bellman, and Lohse (2002). https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/nymh2January 14, 2022Gilad Feldman LabN=277 online panelN=1920 Mturk
S. M. Tully, H. E. Hershfield, T. Meyvis, Seeking lasting enjoyment with limited money: Financial constraints increase preference for material goods over experiences. J. Consum. Res. 42, 59–755O’Donnell, M., Dev, A. S., Antonoplis, S., Baum, S. M., Benedetti, A. H., Brown, N. D., … & Nelson, L. D. (2021). Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(44).YesNovember 2, 2021Scarcity PNASN=407 MturkN=712 Mturk
Lee, S., Baumgartner, H., & Winterich, K. P. (2018). Did they earn it? Observing unearned luxury consumption decreases brand attitude when observers value fairness. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 28(3), 412-436.4O’Donnell, M., Dev, A. S., Antonoplis, S., Baum, S. M., Benedetti, A. H., Brown, N. D., … & Nelson, L. D. (2021). Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(44).November 2, 2021Scarcity PNASN=251 undergradsN=604 Mturk
Fernbach, P. M., Kan, C., & Lynch Jr, J. G. (2015). Squeezed: Coping with constraint through efficiency and prioritization. Journal of Consumer Research, 41(5), 1204-1227.2O’Donnell, M., Dev, A. S., Antonoplis, S., Baum, S. M., Benedetti, A. H., Brown, N. D., … & Nelson, L. D. (2021). Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(44).November 2, 2021Scarcity PNASN=102 MturkN=255 Mturk
Monga, A., May, F., & Bagchi, R. (2017). Eliciting time versus money: time scarcity underlies asymmetric wage rates. Journal of consumer research, 44(4), 833-852.4O’Donnell, M., Dev, A. S., Antonoplis, S., Baum, S. M., Benedetti, A. H., Brown, N. D., … & Nelson, L. D. (2021). Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(44).November 2, 2021Scarcity PNASN=189 MturkN=467 Mturk
Roux, C., Goldsmith, K., & Bonezzi, A. (2015). On the psychology of scarcity: When reminders of resource scarcity promote selfish (and generous) behavior. Journal of consumer research, 42(4), 615-631.4O’Donnell, M., Dev, A. S., Antonoplis, S., Baum, S. M., Benedetti, A. H., Brown, N. D., … & Nelson, L. D. (2021). Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(44).November 2, 2021Scarcity PNASN=157 MturkN=414 Mturk
Zhu, M., & Ratner, R. K. (2015). Scarcity polarizes preferences: The impact on choice among multiple items in a product class. Journal of Marketing Research, 52(1), 13-26.2O’Donnell, M., Dev, A. S., Antonoplis, S., Baum, S. M., Benedetti, A. H., Brown, N. D., … & Nelson, L. D. (2021). Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(44).November 2, 2021Scarcity PNASN=200 online participantsN=595 Mturk
Mehta, R., & Zhu, M. (2016). Creating when you have less: The impact of resource scarcity on product use creativity. Journal of Consumer Research, 42(5), 767-782.2O’Donnell, M., Dev, A. S., Antonoplis, S., Baum, S. M., Benedetti, A. H., Brown, N. D., … & Nelson, L. D. (2021). Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(44).November 2, 2021Scarcity PNASN=153 onlineN=381 Mturk
Kristofferson, K., McFerran, B., Morales, A. C., & Dahl, D. W. (2017). The dark side of scarcity promotions: how exposure to limited-quantity promotions can induce aggression. Journal of Consumer Research, 43(5), 683-706.5O’Donnell, M., Dev, A. S., Antonoplis, S., Baum, S. M., Benedetti, A. H., Brown, N. D., … & Nelson, L. D. (2021). Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(44).November 2, 2021Scarcity PNASN=194 MturkN=502 Mturk
Durante, K. M., Griskevicius, V., Redden, J. P., & Edward White, A. (2015). Spending on daughters versus sons in economic recessions. Journal of Consumer Research, 42(3), 435-457.4O’Donnell, M., Dev, A. S., Antonoplis, S., Baum, S. M., Benedetti, A. H., Brown, N. D., … & Nelson, L. D. (2021). Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(44).November 2, 2021Scarcity PNASN=194 MturkN=502 Mturk
Cook, L. A., & Sadeghein, R. (2018). Effects of perceived scarcity on financial decision making. Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, 37(1), 68-87.3O’Donnell, M., Dev, A. S., Antonoplis, S., Baum, S. M., Benedetti, A. H., Brown, N. D., … & Nelson, L. D. (2021). Empirical audit and review and an assessment of evidentiary value in research on the psychological consequences of scarcity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(44).YesNovember 2, 2021Scarcity PNASThey got a significant 3-way interaction like the original but didn’t indicate whether it followed the same pattern (triple threat borrowed the most)N=199 MturkN=507 Mturk
Jordan Etkin, Sarah A Memmi, Goal Conflict Encourages Work and Discourages Leisure, Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 47, Issue 5, February 2021, Pages 716–736,1ahttp://datacolada.org/97May 4, 2021Data ReplicadaN = 210 MturkN = 1008 Mturk; N = 1127 Mturk
Feinberg, R. A. (1986). Credit cards as spending facilitating stimuli: A conditioning interpretation. Journal of consumer research, 13(3), 348-356.2Xiao, Q., Lam, C. S., Piara, M., & Feldman, G. (2021). Revisiting status quo bias: Replication of Samuelson and Zeckhauser (1988)‎. Meta-Psychology, 5.February 3, 2021N=60 undergradsN=178 Mturk N=205 Mturk; N=118 Belgium lab N=191 Belgium online
Thomas, M., Desai, K. K., & Seenivasan, S. (2011). How credit card payments increase unhealthy food purchases: Visceral regulation of vices. Journal of consumer research, 38(1), 126-139.2Xiao, Q., Lam, C. S., Piara, M., & Feldman, G. (2021). Revisiting status quo bias: Replication of Samuelson and Zeckhauser (1988)‎. Meta-Psychology, 5.February 3, 2021N=151 university studentsN=178 Mturk N=205 Mturk; N=118 Belgium lab N=191 Belgium online
Wang, Y., & Griskevicius, V. (2014). Conspicuous Consumption, Relationships, and Rivals: Women’s Luxury Products as Signals to Other Women. Journal of Consumer Research, 40(5), 834–854. https://doi.org/10.1086/6732561Tunca, B., & Yanar, E. (2020). Women’s Luxury Products as Signals to Other Women. Journal of Marketing Behavior, 4(2-4), 227-238. https://doi.org/10.1561/107.00000066December 21, 20201st study was conceptual; 2nd study was direct replicationN=69 MturkN=250 Prolific; N=255 Prolific
Cian L, Longoni C, Krishna A. Advertising a Desired Change: When Process Simulation Fosters (vs. Hinders) Credibility and Persuasion. Journal of Marketing Research. 2020;57(3):489-508. doi:10.1177/00222437209047582http://datacolada.org/94YesDecember 3, 2020Data ReplicadaN=213 MturkN=761 Mturk; N=769 Mturk
Sokolova T, Seenivasan S, Thomas M. The Left-Digit Bias: When and Why Are Consumers Penny Wise and Pound Foolish? Journal of Marketing Research. 2020;57(4):771-788. doi:10.1177/00222437209325321http://datacolada.org/92October 1, 2020Data ReplicadaBoth replications showed marginal directional support for the effects (p=.091,p=.099)N=145 MturkN=1099 Mturk; N=1555 Mturk
Noah Vanbergen, Caglar Irmak, Julio Sevilla, Product Entitativity: How the Presence of Product Replicates Increases Perceived and Actual Product Efficacy, Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 47, Issue 2, August 2020, Pages 192–214, https://doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucaa0061http://datacolada.org/90August 18, 2020Data ReplicadaN=87 MturkN=636 Mturk: N=574 Mturk; N=702 Mturk
Hanyong Park, Ashok K Lalwani, David H Silvera, The Impact of Resource Scarcity on Price-Quality Judgments, Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 46, Issue 6, April 2020, Pages 1110–1124, https://doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucz0312Ahttp://datacolada.org/89July 21, 2020Data ReplicadaThis was actually inconclusive. There was a high rate of attrition that differed across conditions and seemed to severely bias the results.N=149 MturkN=773 Mturk; N=2101 Mturk
Feifei Huang, Vincent Chi Wong, Echo Wen Wan, The Influence of Product Anthropomorphism on Comparative Judgment, Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 46, Issue 5, February 2020, Pages 936–955, https://doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucz0282http://datacolada.org/87May 20, 2020Data ReplicadaN=101 MturkN=562 Mturk; N=584 Prolific
Irmak et al., 2013 C. Irmak, C.J. Wakslak, Y. Trope Selling the forest, buying the trees: The effect of construal level on seller-buyer price discrepancy Journal of Consumer Research, 40 (2013), pp. 284-297, 10.1086/6700202Ignazio Ziano, Jing Dan Yao, Yajing Gao, Gilad Feldman, Impact of ownership on liking and value: Replications and extensions of three ownership effect experiments, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Volume 89, 2020, 103972, ISSN 0022-1031, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2020.103972.May 19, 2020Gilad Feldman LabN=60 undergraduatesN=311 Mturk; N=1001 Mturk
Dubois, David, Derek D. Rucker, and Adam D. Galinsky. “Super size me: Product size as a signal of status.” Journal of Consumer Research 38, no. 6 (2012): 1047-1062.1Ziano, Ignazio, and Burak Tunca. 2020. “Super Size Me: An Unsuccessful Preregistered Replication of the Effect of Product Size on Status Signaling.” PsyArXiv. April 19. doi:10.31234/osf.io/fm7aj.April 19, 2020N=183 undergraduatesN=415 Mturk
Kyra L Wiggin, Martin Reimann, Shailendra P Jain, Curiosity Tempts Indulgence, Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 45, Issue 6, April 2019, Pages 1194–1212, https://doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucy0553http://datacolada.org/85March 10, 2020Data ReplicadaThe first study actually worked due to demand effect. When removed, the study failed. Should maybe be 1/2, but saying 0/2 seemed more accurate.N=197 MturkN=1518 Mturk; N=1489 Mturk
Jennifer Savary, Ravi Dhar, The Uncertain Self: How Self-Concept Structure Affects Subscription Choice, Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 46, Issue 5, February 2020, Pages 887–903, https://doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucz0224http://datacolada.org/84February 11, 2020Data ReplicadaN=405 mturkN=1283 Mturk
Eugenia C Wu, Sarah G Moore, Gavan J Fitzsimons, Wine for the Table: Self-Construal, Group Size, and Choice for Self and Others, Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 46, Issue 3, October 2019, Pages 508–527, https://doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucy0823http://datacolada.org/83January 15, 2020Data ReplicadaThe 3-way interaction worked in one study but the shape of the interaction did not support the original hypothesesN=250 MturkN=1118 Mturk; N=1305 Mturk
1. Jami A. Having Control Over and Above Situations: The Influence of Elevated Viewpoints on Risk Taking. Journal of Marketing Research. 2019;56(2):230-244. doi:10.1177/00222437188135441bhttp://datacolada.org/82December 11, 2019Data ReplicadaN=203 MturkN=603 Mturk
Mazar, N., Amir, O., & Ariely, D. (2008). The Dishonesty of Honest People: A Theory of Self-Concept Maintenance. Journal of Marketing Research, 45(6), 633–644. doi:10.1509/jmkr.45.6.633 1Verschuere B, Meijer EH, Jim A, et al. Registered Replication Report on Mazar, Amir, and Ariely (2008). Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science. September 2018:299-317. doi:10.1177/2515245918781032September 1, 2018229 students25 replications (total N=4674) w/students in large classrooms
Wadhwa, M., & Zhang, K. (2015). This number just feels right: The impact of roundedness of price numbers on product evaluations. Journal of Consumer Research, 41(5), 1172-1185.5Harms, C., Genau, H. A., Meschede, C., & Beauducel, A. (2018). Does it actually feel right? A replication attempt of the rounded price effect. Royal Society open science, 5(4), 171127.April 25, 2018N=318 MturkN=588 German speakers recruited through various online channels
Wadhwa, M., & Zhang, K. (2015). This number just feels right: The impact of roundedness of price numbers on product evaluations. Journal of Consumer Research, 41(5), 1172-1185.3O’Donnell, M., & Nelson, L. D. (2015, December 3). Wadhwa & Zhang, 2015 Study 3 Replication. https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/AM32KApril 25, 2018This study is described in Harms et al. 2018 (another replication of Wadhwa and Zhang 2015)N=177 (Mturk?)N=750? Mturk?
Gorn, G. J. (1982). The effects of music in advertising on choice behavior: A classical conditioning approach. Journal of marketing, 46(1), 94-101.1Vermeulen, I., Batenburg, A., Beukeboom, C. J., & Smits, T. (2014). Breakthrough or One-Hit Wonder?. Social Psychology.January 1, 2014N=205 undergradsN=158 students; N=190 students; N=91 students
Sussman, A. B., & Olivola, C. Y. (2011). Axe the tax: Taxes are disliked more than equivalent costs. Journal of Marketing Research, 48(SPL), S91-S101.1,2Olsen, J., Kogler, C., Brandt, M. J., Dezső, L., & Kirchler, E. (2019). Are consumption taxes really disliked more than equivalent costs? Inconclusive results in the USA and no effect in the UK. Journal of Economic Psychology, 75, 102145.06-Feb-19There was a slight, barely significant effect in the USA sample of Experiment 2 (p = .012, r = 0.09, 95% CI [0.01, 0.16]) but not for Experiment 1. Both experiments failed in the UK extension.Experiment 1 N = 191 (Mturk, mall intercept, undergrads); Experiment 2 N=351 MturkExperiment 1 Prolific (N = 596 US and N = 600 UK); Experiment 2 Prolific (N = 702 US and N = 699 UK)
Klink, R. R. (2000). Creating brand names with meaning: the use of sound symbolism. Market. Lett. 11, 5–20. doi: 10.1023/A:10081844238241Motoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.Yes28-Oct-22Sensory marketingN=265 US undergradsN=823 recruited from Crowdworks online (Japanese participants)
Shrum, L. J., Lowrey, T. M., Luna, D., Lerman, D. B., and Liu, M. (2012). Sound symbolism effects across languages: implications for global brand names. Int. J. Res. Market. 29, 275–279. doi: 10.1016/j.ijresmar.2012.03.0021a, 1b, 1cMotoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.Yes28-Oct-22Sensory marketingn=88 French undergrads; n=88 U.S. undergrads (large proportion of Hispanic students); n=181 Chinese undergradsN=823 recruited from Crowdworks online (Japanese participants)
Hagtvedt, H., and Brasel, S. A. (2017). Color Saturation Increases Perceived Product Size. J. Consum. Res. 44, 396–413. doi: 10.1093/jcr/ucx0393Motoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.28-Oct-22Sensory Marketing77 undergradsN=823 recruited from Crowdworks online (Japanese participants)
Romero, M., and Biswas, D. (2016). Healthy-left, unhealthy-right: can displaying healthy. items to the left (vs. right) of unhealthy items nudge healthier choices? J. Consum. Res. 43, 103–112. doi: 10.1093/jcr/ucw0081BMotoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.28-Oct-22Sensory Marketingn=93 U.S. undergradsN=823 recruited from Crowdworks online (Japanese participants)
Yorkston, E., and Menon, G. (2004). A sound idea: phonetic effects of brand names on consumer judgments. J. Consum. Res. 31, 43–51. doi: 10.1086/3834221Motoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.28-Oct-22Sensory Marketingn=1236 US undergradsN=823 recruited from Crowdworks online (Japanese participants)
Motoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.4Motoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.28-Oct-22Sensory Marketingn=78 online panelN=823 recruited from Crowdworks online (Japanese participants)
Jiang, Y., Gorn, G. J., Galli, M., and Chattopadhyay, A. (2015). Does your company have the right logo? How and why circular- and angularlogo shapes influence brand attribute judgments. J. Consum. Res. 42, 709–726. doi: 10.1093/jcr/ucv0491Motoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.28-Oct-22Sensory Marketingn=109 undergradsN=823 recruited from Crowdworks online (Japanese participants)
Chae, B., and Hoegg, J. (2013). The future looks “right”: effects of the horizontal location. of advertising images on product attitude. J. Consum. Res. 40, 223–238. doi: 10.1086/6694762Motoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.28-Oct-22Sensory Marketingn=194 English speaking online subject poolN=823 recruited from Crowdworks online (Japanese participants)
Cian, L., Krishna, A., and Elder, R. S. (2014). This logo moves me: dynamic imagery from static images. J. Market. Res. 51, 184–197. doi: 10.1509/jmr. 13.00231Motoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.28-Oct-22Sensory Marketingn=74 U.S. undergradsN=823 recruited from Crowdworks online (Japanese participants)
Madzharov, a V., and Block, L. G. (2010). Effects of product unit image on consumption of snack foods. J. Consum. Psychol. 20, 398–409. doi: 10.1016/j.jcps.2010.06.0071aMotoki, K., & Iseki, S. Evaluating Replicability of Ten Influential Research on Sensory Marketing. Frontiers in Communication, 231.28-Oct-22Sensory Marketingn=37 U.S. undergradsN=823 recruited from Crowdworks online (Japanese participants)

Inclusion criterion: Original study appeared in a marketing journal (journals with the word “consumer” or “marketing” in the title).